Architectural Hoisting - video of Atlanta talk

Mar 18, 2012 | George Fairbanks

I presented my work on Architecture Hoisting last week in Atlanta. The big idea is that software often relies on global design constraints (guiderails) to achieve its qualities (e.g., reliability, security).

But you’ve really only got two options for ensuring those guiderails: (1) developer vigilance and (2) architecture hoisting. In the small (say inside of a data structure), using vigilance to keep an invariant is possible. In the large, architectural guiderails (self-imposed constraints that simplify the software) are much harder to ensure, as the recent remote exploit in Google Chrome (a use-after-free bug) illustrates.

The other option, architecture hoisting, has not been widely recognized so this talk gives it a clear definition, shows examples of it in use, and discusses its applicability and trade-offs.

Abstract

Software architecture focuses on quality attribute requirements, such as scalability or performance, that are overall properties of a system. This talk describes Architecture Hoisting, a a design technique where the architecture ensures an intensional design constraint (i.e., a guiderail) to achieve a global property. Discussed examples include the NASA JPL Mission Data System, Enterprise Java Beans, and the Apache Portable Runtime.

About

George Fairbanks is a software developer, designer, and architect living in New York city

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